Guantanamo

Cases

Zahir Hamdoun’s Periodic Review Board (PRB) proceedings are part of an administrative process the Obama administration established to review the cases of those Guantánamo detainees it has neither...
A habeas corpus petition on behalf of the only Guantánamo detainee who the government has openly admitted was tortured.
Davliatov v. Obama is a habeas corpus case on behalf of Muhammadi Davliatov, a native of Tajikistan. Davliatov was detained without charge at Guantánamo Bay for more than 14 years, despite being...
Habeas corpus petition on behalf of Tariq Ba Odah, a cleared Yemeni man who has been detained at Guantánamo without charge since 2002.
Representing a Yemeni citizen held without charge at Guantanamo since 2002.
One enduring and pernicious myth about the men detained at Guantánamo is that they were all sent to the prison after being captured on the battlefield by U.S. forces in order to neutralize the threat...
CCR filed an amicus brief in the case of U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, a former Taliban prisoner in Afghanistan who was released in 2014 in exchange for five Guantanamo prisoners. Bergdahl is...
A petition for habeas corpus filed on behalf of Khaled Abd el Ghabar Mohammed Othman by his family members in Yemen as “next friends” (the traditional mode of challenging detention by the executive...
Civil cases seeking compensatory damages for six former Guantánamo detainees for torture and other abuse.
Guantanamo habeas petition in D.C. District Court, and human rights petition and request for precautionary measures before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (“IACHR”) for Djamel Ameziane
Representing David Hicks, an Australian citizen who was detained for five and a half years at Guantánamo, where he was tortured.
CCR's first landmark Supreme Court case establishing the rights of the Guantanamo detainees.
CCR argues that an appeals court wrongly decided that Congress has the power to forbid federal courts from considering claims by former Guantánamo detainees.
Hamdan filed his petition for habeas corpus, claiming that the military commission lacked authority to try him since there was no congressional act that authorized them. Further, Hamdan’s...
Habeas corpus and Detainee Treatment Act petitions on behalf of Guantánamo detainee Mohammed Sulaymon Barre
Zalita v. Bush was a petition for habeas corpus filed on behalf of Abu Abdul Rauf Zalita, a.k.a. Abdul Ra’ouf Ammar Mohammad Abu Al Qassim. Mr. Abu Al Qassim was conscripted into the Libyan Army when...
A case brought by four former Guantanamo prisoners against former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld seeking damages for their arbitrary detention and torture.
A habeas corpus petition filed in the D.C. District Court on behalf of 17 innocent Uighur men who have been imprisoned in Guantánamo Bay for almost seven years. The government acknowledged as...
Khan Tumani, et al., v. Obama, el al ., was a habeas corpus petition filed on behalf of Abdul Nasser Khan Tumani and Muhammed Khan Tumani, a father and son from Syria who were unlawfully detained in...
Hamdi v. Rumsfeld is a case that challenged the arrest and denial of due process to U.S. citizen Yaser Esam Hamdi before the U.S. Supreme Court. The Center for Constitutional Rights’ (CCR) amicus...
Haitian Centers Council, Inc. v. Sale was a case which secured an order in federal court that closed the detention camp for HIV-positive Haitian refugees at Guantánamo. Once in office, President Bill...

For over a decade, CCR has been at the forefront of the legal battle against indefinite detention and torture at Guantánamo, representing many current and former detainees. We sent one of the first civilian lawyers to the base; organized a network of hundreds of lawyers (the “GITMO bar”) to represent the men detained there; and won landmark Supreme Court cases that established U.S. court jurisdiction over the prison and affirmed detainees’ right to habeas corpus review. Nearly 800 Muslim men and boys were thrown into this island prison designed to exist beyond the rule of law; today, over 90 are still there, the vast majority of them never charged with a single crime. Many have been cleared for release by the U.S. government itself, yet they remain trapped there by bureaucratic inaction and politics. Through a combination of strategic litigation, advocacy with the U.S. and foreign governments and international human rights bodies, and creative public education efforts focused on highlighting the stories of our clients, we continue working tirelessly to secure their freedom and close Guantánamo. Our work also continues after our clients’ release, as we help them rebuild their lives and demand accountability for what was done to them.

CCR's Omar Farah describes Mohammed's and Tariq's reaction on hearing the news of their imminent release, and his own. "With your hands and your help, we’ll be able to close Guantanamo.”
CCR video