Freedom Flicks

Freedom Flicks

At CCR, we believe in the transformative power of art and culture to fuel social justice movements by opening hearts and minds to new possibilities. We believe that stories of struggle and courage, be it in film, journalism, music, or a legal case, have the power to challenge paradigms of oppression and inspire people to seek change. With the support of the Bertha Foundation, we are bringing some of these stories to new audiences every month through Freedom Flicks, a monthly film series designed to engage people across disciplines in the defining stories of political and social unrest that shape our world, past and present. Each month the BJI hosts a free screening of a cutting-edge, socially engaged documentary, harnessing the power of film to educate, activate, and build community. Each screening is followed by a short conversation with a combination of prominent artists, filmmakers, lawyers and activists where we discuss the film's themes, criticisms, and intersecting issue areas. Be sure to check our calendar for all upcoming Freedom Flicks events!


Past Freedom Flicks

 

Do the Right Thing

Do the Right Thing
a Spike Lee Joint

“Mother Sister’s always watching.” This line, from the critically acclaimed film Do the Right Thing, fully embodies the feeling in Black and Latino communities. A need to protect oneself and monitor one’s own neighborhood from internal and external threats has always been the modality of communities of color – as true today as it was when the film was released. Today, with the influx of gentrification and the ever-increasing militarization of law enforcement in Black and Latino communities, people of color in this country are experiencing a heightened level of aggression and repression.
More information >>

 

Troublers

Troublers
by Young Lee

“You do not belong here on earth!” people yell at the filmmaker and crew of Troublers, a film by Young Lee that tells the chilling story of the repression LGBTQI community members face in South Korea. The film centers the voices of elders and others caught up in the national debate and shines a light on their struggle.
More information >>

 

SOLITARY

SOLITARY

SOLITARY gives an unprecedented glimpse into what life in solitary confinement looks like for inmates in the Red Onion State Prison in rural Virginia.
More information >>

 

1971

1971

Before Edward Snowden, before Wikileaks, and before Watergate, there was The Citizens’ Commission to Investigate the FBI. 1971 is an engrossing documentary that tells the story of a band of Citizens’ Commission members who, in 1971, broke into a small FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania
More information >>

 

Spotlight

Spotlight

Starring Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, and Rachel McAdams, Spotlight tells the true story of the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning exposé of the decades-long cover-up of sexual violence at the highest levels of Boston archdiocese, and the courage of survivors like Phil Saviano who fought back. The exposé touched off a wave of revelations around the country and world.
More information >>

 

Camp X-Ray

Camp X-Ray
by Peter Sattler

Camp X-Ray focuses on the story of private first-class Amy Cole and the relationship she forges with a Guantánamo detainee, allowing her to see through the many misconceptions about the prison and the men being held there.
More information >>

 

CITIZENFOUR

CITIZENFOUR
by Laura Poitras

CITIZENFOUR is a real life thriller, unfolding by the minute, giving audiences unprecedented access to filmmaker Laura Poitras’ and journalist Glenn Greenwald’s encounters with Edward Snowden in Hong Kong, as he hands over classified documents providing evidence of mass indiscriminate and illegal invasions of privacy by the National Security Agency (NSA).
More information >>

 

Treasure: From Tragedy to Trans Justice, Mapping a Detroit Story
by dream hampton

Treasure tells the story of Shelley "Treasure" Hillard, a 19-year-old trans woman of color from Detroit, who was coerced into informing on a drug dealer and had her identity divulged by police—and was brutally murdered as result. In the film, Hampton raises critical questions about the circumstances surrounding Shelley's murder, and highlights the stories of her loved ones who have turned themselves into activists and the community organizers galvanized by her story.
More information >>

 

Black Panthers: Vanguard of a Revolution
by Stanley Nelson

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is the first feature-length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for Black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails. The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is an essential history and a vibrant chronicle of this pivotal movement that birthed a new revolutionary culture in America.
More information >>

 

If A Tree Falls
by Marshall Curry

Exploring how far is too far in the fight for environmental justice and in the pursuit of criminal justice, If a Tree Falls is a deeply personal story that interrogates what we mean by terrorism and the strategies we use to bring about the social change we want to see.
More information >>

 

Resistencia: the Fight for the Aguan Valley
by Jesse Freeston, cosponsored with Departamento 19 – NY

Resistencia: The Fight for the Aguan Valley captures the remarkable and inspiring story of the Aguan Valley campesino (farm worker) movement that followed the military coup that overthrew former Honduran President Manuel Zelaya. Under the constant threat of physical violence, village raids and disappearances, the courageous campesino community of the Aguan Valley organizes to take back the land from corrupt land barons and fight for their basic human rights.
More information >>

 

Call Me Kuchu
by Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall

In Uganda, "Kuchu" is a synonym for "queer." Call Me Kuchu tells the story of Uganda's courageous and visionary Kuchu community, where the influence of white, Western, evangelical rhetoric, public outings and fearmongering by the press, and draconian legislation in the form of the "Anti-Homosexuality Bill" – also known as the "Kill the Gays Bill" – has made living as an LGBTIQ person dangerous and sometimes even deadly. The film is also a celebration of the life and activism of David Kato, Uganda's first openly gay man and Advocacy Officer of the LGBTIQ advocacy organization Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG).
More information>>

 

The Square
by Jehane Noujaim

Since 2011, the Egyptian Revolution and Egypt's shifting political landscape have been headline news. With this Academy Award-nominated film, we're offered a glimpse behind the headlines, as we follow the lives of young Egyptian revolutionaries. Armed with little more than cameras, social media, and determination, they put their lives on the line in the struggle for liberation.
More information >>

 

The Newburgh Sting
by David Heilbroner and Kate Davis, in partnership with DRUM and No Separate Justice

In the small community of Newburgh, New York, a mysterious businessman infiltrates a mosque, supposedly to cultivate business associates. In fact, he is an FBI informant and orchestrates a sting operation that leads to the arrest of four Black men for their involvement in a manufactured terrorism plot. An official selection of the Tribeca Film Festival and a featured HBO documentary, The Newburgh Sting powerfully highlights the intersection between pervasive post-9/11 government surveillance of Muslims and the historical targeting of Black, low-income communities in America. It is a critical and timely look at the impact of discriminatory policing and, indeed, the value placed on Black lives.
More information >>

 

Waiting for Fahd
by the Center for Constitutional Rights

Through moving interviews with his family, Waiting for Fahd paints a vivid portrait of the life that awaits a man who, despite being twice cleared for release, continues to languish in Guantánamo prison, denied his home, his livelihood, and his loved ones based on his nationality.
More information >>

 

Soft Vengeance: Albie Sachs and the New South Africa
by Abby Ginzberg

Imprisoned in solitary confinement, tortured through sleep deprivation, and the target of a car bombing by South African security forces in 1988, the story of Albie Sachs, freedom fighter and lawyer to those committed to ending apartheid, is one of perseverance and courage. Join Albie Sachs and filmmaker Abby Ginzberg on Sunday, November 16th as the Bertha Justice Institute at the Center for Constitutional Rights Freedom Flicks film series partners with DOC NYC film festival to present Soft Vengeance, an award-winning documentary that tells Albie's incredible story.
More information >>

 

Paris is Burning
by Jennie Livingston

The year is 1987, Ronald Reagan is President, the country is in the midst of booming economic growth, and AZT has just become available to treat HIV/AIDS. This provides the backdrop of the iconic, Sundance award-winning film Paris is Burning, which explores the thriving ball community in New York in the 1980s where butch queens, Banji boys and vogue-femmes compete for realness and struggle for survival in the face of racism, poverty, violence and homelessness. In addition to surfacing important issues of gender, class, race and identity, Paris is Burning remains a an important organizing tool for LGBTQ communities and a celebration of the power of community-building and performance art in the face of adversity.
More information >>

 

Who is Dayani Cristal?
by Marc Silver

In the depths of the Sonora Desert an unidentified body is found decomposing under the hot sun. The only marker is an exposed tattoo that reads "Dayani Cristal". Join the Bertha Justice Institute at the Center for Constitutional Rights for a screening of the award-winning documentary, Who is Dayani Cristal? in which Gael Garcia Bernal and a group of forensic scientists seek to answer the title's central question, tracing, along the way, a perilous journey of migration from Central America that, for many, spells death. A beautifully filmed documentary, Who is Dayani Cristal? insists we examine U.S. immigration policy and its impact on human lives.
More information >>

 

Slingshot Hip Hop
by Jackie Reem Salloum

From the stylings of Grand Master Flash to Public Enemy, Hip Hop has a long tradition of being used as a form a political speech and resistance. On Thursday, August 21st the Bertha Justice Institute at the Center for Constitutional Rights invites you to join us for an exclusive screening of the award-winning documentary Slingshot Hip Hop, which braids together the stories of young Palestinians living in Gaza, the West Bank, and Israel as they discover Hip Hop and employ it as a tool to surmount divisions imposed by occupation and poverty.
More information>>

 

Freedom Summer
by Stanley Nelson

Freedom Summer tells the arresting tale of student-activists and Mississippi Delta residents who, in the summer of 1964, united to break the yoke of white supremacy that systematically denied Mississippi's black vote. We chose this film on the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer to reflect that historical struggle for freedom and to challenge us to think about what freedom looks like in 2014.
More information >>

 

Last modified 

August 17, 2016