Evangelicals Are Winning The Gay Marriage Fight -- in Africa and Russia

Print Friendly and PDF

National Journal

January, 2014

Evangelical advocates, having failed here, are finding friendlier audiences all over the world.

Long before President Obama selected three gay athletes to lead the American delegation to the Sochi Olympics, long before President Vladimir Putin declared Russia to be the world's new "moral compass," and long before practically anyone in the West had even heard of that country's new "homosexual propaganda" law, one American had thought deeply about it—because he'd helped invent it. "My greatest success, in terms of my own personal strategy, is Russia," Scott Lively says from his native Massachusetts, where he launched a quixotic bid for governor this year.

Lively, who is being sued in U.S. federal court by a gay-rights group for alleged crimes against humanity over his work fighting "the gay agenda" in Uganda, led a 50-city tour through the former Soviet Union several years ago to warn its citizens about the international gay conspiracy. His message and his proposed solution—to criminalize LGBT advocacy—were received with open arms in town-hall meetings, local legislatures, and St. Petersburg, which sent an open letter to the Russian people and later became one of the first cities in the country to outlaw "homosexual propaganda," paving the way for the national legislation.

Read full piece here.