Help Hold George W. Bush Accountable for Torture

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Synopsis

Help support four torture survivors in their effort to hold Bush accountable when he visits Canada by emailing Canadian Attorney General Robert Nicholson (at Nichor@parl.gc.ca) and urging him to support the private prosecutions. Prior to the filing of their case, CCR and the CCIJ twice (on Sept. 29, 2011 and Oct. 14, 2011) petitioned Attorney General Nicholson to launch a criminal investigation against Bush during his visit to Canada, but received no response.  Even if the United States has failed to meet its obligations to hold torturers accountable, Canada has an opportunity and a legal obligation to position itself on the right side of history and the law.

Learn more about this case by reading the Letter of Support of Private Prosecutions signed by human rights organizations and by viewing a copy of the filing. For information about the case against Bush see CCR’s page on the Bush Torture Indictment.

 

Description

In advance of George W. Bush's scheduled trip to Canada, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and the Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ) assisted in the launch of a private prosecution against Bush for torture, in the Provincial Court in Surrey, British Columbia, by four individuals who allege they were tortured during his tenure as president of the United States.

Help support the four plaintiffs in their effort to hold Bush accountable by emailing Canadian Attorney General Robert Nicholson (at Nichor@parl.gc.ca) and urging him to support the private prosecutions. Prior to the filing of this case, CCR and the CCIJ twice (on Sept. 29, 2011 and Oct. 14, 2011) petitioned Attorney General Nicholson to launch a criminal investigation against Bush during his visit to Canada, but received no response.  Even if the United States has failed to meet its obligations to hold torturers accountable, Canada has an opportunity and a legal obligation to position itself on the right side of history and the law.
 
The four men, Hassan bin Attash, Sami el-Hajj, Muhammed Khan Tumani and Murat Kurnaz, each endured years of horrific and unlawful treatment in U.S. custody. While three of them have been released without ever facing charges, Hassan Bin Attash still remains in detention at Guantánamo Bay without being formally charged with any wrongdoing. “I lost my family, my father, my health, my education because of George Bush. Although I was completely innocent, I lost nearly 10 years of my life,” said former Guantánamo detainee and torture survivor Muhammed Khan Tumani. “I suffered greatly while detained at Guantánamo, and continue to suffer. George Bush must face justice and be held accountable for his actions, which continue to cause me and so many harm.”
 
Canada’s criminal code and its ratification of the UN Convention Against Torture gives it a clear legal obligation to initiate an investigation and prosecution when Mr. Bush sets foot in the country.  The purpose of the Convention is to eradicate safe havens for persons who commit, order, or participate in acts of torture—including acts which Bush has himself admitted to having authorized.
 
Learn more about this case by reading the Letter of Support of Private Prosecutions signed by human rights organizations and by viewing a copy of the filing. For information about the case against Bush see CCR’s page on the Bush Torture Indictment.